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How its Made

Woods Management

I participate in all aspects of the harvest and production myself. That begins with healthy management of the woods. We are stewards of the land at heart. Our woods and maple trees are our most precious resource. Our harvest season usually runs from March through April for 6 to 8 weeks.

 
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How its Made

Tapping

Once we have a healthy group of trees, we begin by tapping them with spouts. This requires a small hole to be drilled into the bark of the tree and the spout to be inserted. Every year when the season is over, we remove the spouts and the holes heal over. This is why it is important to only tap healthy trees.

 
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How its Made

Collection

Once the spouts are put in the tree, the sap will begin flowing. In order to collect that sap, the spouts will then be connected to buckets, bags or tubing lines. Once those buckets are full of sap, I collect them and transport the sap back to the production room where the boiling begins.

 
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How its Made

Production

Once the sap is transported back to the production room, the boiling process begins. We boil the sap on a 5 ft by 16 ft evaporator that is fueled by wood. The sap that we collect is usually 3% maple sap. That means that it is 97% water! Therefore it takes 29 gallons of sap to produce 1 gallon of syrup! We test all of our syrup with a hydrometer to make sure that the density of the syrup is correct. The finished syrup is then run through a filter press so that the cleanest product is produced. We store all of our syrup in stainless steel before it is bottled into plastic, tin or glass containers for sale.

 
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How its Made

The Weather

Our production is dependent on the weather. In order for the sap to flow from the tree, we need a fluctuation in outside temperature. This fluctuation in temperature causes a difference in pressure within the tree. Ideal conditions for sap to flow include nighttime temperatures that are below freezing and daytime temperatures that are above freezing. Where we farm in Northern New York, this makes our production season March through April.